Raised Bed Gardening

Raised Bed Gardening

Gardening Methods, Raised Bed Gardening
Advantages of gardening in raised beds... Plants in raised beds get more sun and air circulation and they can make better use of water. You often can plant earlier and harvest later, because raised beds warm up early in the spring and stay warm later in the fall. Raised beds also make ideal places to grow plants that can be invasive in a regular garden – such as mints and horseradish. But ease and convenience is the benefit many gardeners appreciate the most. If you get a bad back and sore knees every year from gardening, a raised bed may put an end to those aches and pains. Raised vegetable beds are excellent for gardeners who have trouble with their backs and older people who don't have limited flexibility. They…
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Vegetable Gardening Made Easy

Vegetable Gardening Made Easy

Gardening Methods, Growing Food, Healthy Eating, Organic Gardening
Growing your own vegetables is both fun and rewarding. Lets break it down together and get the most food, enjoyment, and nutrition from our gardens! 1. feed the soil 2. efficient use of space 3. keep food moving 4. continuous harvest 5. good record keeping 6. resources feed the soil All you really need to get started is some decent soil and a few plants. But to be a really successful vegetable gardener, and to do it organically, you'll need to understand what it takes to keep your plants healthy and vigorous. Here are the basics. 'Feed the soil' is like a mantra for organic gardeners, and with good reason. In conventional chemical agriculture, crop plants are indeed "fed" directly using synthetic fertilizers. [caption id="attachment_2197" align="alignright" width="211"] observe your garden…
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Companion Plants Top 10 Best

Companion Plants Top 10 Best

Companion Planting, Gardening Methods, Organic Gardening, Organic Pest & Disease Control
Some plants do better when in the company of other plants for a variety of reasons...to repel harmful insects, to attract useful insects, or to enhance the growth rate and flavor of other plants. Companion plants help bring a balanced eco-system to your garden. Every garden is different with different problems. All problems will not be eliminated, but it is definitely worth experimenting with companion plants. Below are the top 10 plant companion combinations. Tomatoes & Basil Both greatly improve the other's growth and flavor. Basil also helps control the tomato hornworm. Garlic & Roses Pests, such as aphids, are repelled by the smell of garlic. [caption id="attachment_1625" align="alignright" width="300"] example of companion plants[/caption] Horseradish & Potatoes Horseradish repels the Colorado potato beetle and blister beetles. Spinach & Strawberries Corn,…
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Grow Lettuce in Containers

Grow Lettuce in Containers

Container Gardening, Growing Food, Healthy Eating, Organic Gardening
Why grow lettuce in a container? In my case it is because the snails and slugs will not let me enjoy fresh, tender lettuce, straight from the garden. For some reason, they have not yet discovered it when grown with this method. Another reason is that it is weed free, making a cut-and-come-again harvest a snap. Still another benefit is that you may move them around as the seasons change. More sun in the spring, more shade in the summer. In many areas lettuce may be grown most of the year this way. The cut-and-come-again harvest is really the key to this type of planting. Here is how you do it: [caption id="attachment_2252" align="alignright" width="300"] lettuce is easy to grow in continers[/caption] Step 1 Plant a blend of leaf lettuce…
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Beat the Heat – Grow an Herb Garden Indoors

Beat the Heat – Grow an Herb Garden Indoors

Container Gardening, Herb Gardening, Indoor Gardening
We've been gone... gardening!Hi gardening readers, I know it has been a while! the garden has taken on a new life this year and we have added a full blown herb farm to the mix. We've been so busy gardening we haven't had time for posting. But I got an email from the folks at Fix and thought, yeah, I'd like to share that one! How to Grow a Thriving Herb Garden is a savvy, helpful (and colorful!) article on growing herbs indoors. It made me feel cool just reading it, not having to be outside in the heat. It provides a germination chart, pruning advice, and planter ideas. Enjoy! P.S. I hope your gardens are doing well! Source: Fix.com Blog
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Forcing Flowering Shrub Blooms

Indoor Gardening
We talked about Forcing Bulbs Inside. But, much less is said about forcing flowering shrubs to bloom . This is easy to do and can be done right in the middle of a raging blizzard! This fact is simply amazing given how easy it is to do. We are about to let you in to one of gardening's best kept secrets. Are you ready?? Forcing those blooms are as easy as one-two-three. One, put on your jacket and hat. Two, grab your pruning shears or a sharp knife. Three, go out to your favorite flowering bush or tree. Four, look for a branch with buds on it. Cut the branch at a length that is right for the vase you will use. Five, bring the branches indoors, and put it…
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Forcing Bulbs Inside

Forcing Bulbs Inside

Indoor Gardening
Forcing Bulbs Forcing bulbs is one of the more enjoyable indoor gardening projects. In simple summary, you are convincing a spring bulb that it has slept through the winter months and encouraging it to awaken into full spring bloom, even though the snow is piling up outside your window. Your reward is a colorful bloom and scent during otherwise grey and drab days. What better way to beat the winter doldrums!?! [caption id="attachment_4199" align="alignright" width="300"] Gemma Evans[/caption] Forcing bulbs is not too difficult. It just takes time, patience and a little advance planning. Sure, you can buy potted bulbs already forced and ready to grow. But why do that? You are the the gardener. Why let someone else get all the fun!?! Step by Easy Step: Select the bulbs you…
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How to Grow Tire Potatoes

How to Grow Tire Potatoes

Gardening Methods, Organic Gardening
I read somewhere that people get so dogmatic about the way they grow their potatoes because basically you can't screw it up. Plant potatoes, water potatoes, harvest potatoes. I have grown potatoes many times in up to four tires high. I have had great success. I have had lousy years. The one real common denominator in bad potatoes is water.... too much, not enough. Potatoes like consistent water, moist soil. Irrigate to assure uniform moisture while the tubers are developing. A uniform moisture supply also helps to cool the ground and eliminate knobs caused by secondary growth. Drowning them with water, letting them dry out and repeating this through the potato's growing season is a recipe for growing scabby, knobby potatos. Tire Growing Potato Facts to Review If you live…
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Three Sisters: An Ancient Garden Trio

Three Sisters: An Ancient Garden Trio

Companion Planting, Gardening Methods, Organic Gardening, Our Homestead
"The Three Sisters all work together. Critters will find it harder to invade your garden by inter-planting your corn, beans and squash. The corn stalk serves as a pole for the beans, the beans help to add the nitrogen to the soil that the corn needs, while the squash provides a ground cover of shade that helps the soil retain moisture."[1] I have read that this companion planting combo helps keep the raccoons off your corn. Evidently they don't like wading through the pricklies of the squash to get up to the corn. I am trying this method at our farm/homestead this year (2010) using Golden Bantam corn, The Three Sisters is the name given by some Native Americans to the practice of growing corn, beans, and squash together. The…
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Air Layering for Difficult to Root Plants

Gardening Methods, Organic Gardening
Air layering is a useful method of producing roots on the stem of indoor landscape plants that have become "leggy" through the loss of their lower foliage. This method, believed to have been developed centuries ago by the Chinese, has been used successfully as a mean of propagating some of the more difficult-to-root plants. Because it required excessive care and patience, air layering was used only by the highly trained plantsman. The procedure was to wound the stem or branch of a plant and enclose the wounded stem with moist sphagnum moss or similar rooting medium until roots develop from the wounded area. Success was dependent upon the ability of the propagator to keep the rooting medium moist until the roots were formed and large enough to support the new…
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