Vegetable Garden Planting Chart

Vegetable Garden Planting Chart

Growing Food, Organic Gardening, Starting Seeds
Schedule your vegetable garden planting with this guide. As you plan which foods that you'd like to grow in your garden, remember that among other things, you must also take the following into account: Soil pH Requirements of Different Garden Vegetables Vegetable Gardening Basics (Planning, Preparing the soil, and Planting) Identifying Your Soil Type Note: This does not include plotting for Square Foot Gardening Food Vegetable Start Seed Indoors Plant in Garden S = SeedP = Plant Seed Spacing Distance Between Rows Seed Depth Days toMaturity YIELD PER100' ROW ArtichokesFeb-MarS - After FrostP - After Frost36"48"1/2"36535+ heads Asparagusn/aP - Mar-April8" between root tips34-36"1/4-1/2"365400+ spears Beans, Bush (snap)n/aS - After Frost4-6"18"1"60-6480 lbs Beans, bush (dry)n/aS - After Frost4-6"24"1"90-1008 lbs Beans, Polen/aS - After Frost8"36"1"70-85150 lbs Beans, Favan/aS - After Frost8"36"1"18020 lbs…
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Squash the Squash Bugs

Squash the Squash Bugs

Organic Pest & Disease Control
Squash bugs are seriously damaging pests. Seriously squish them before they get a foot hold! I abruptly encountered squash bugs for the first time when I came home from a 2 week hiatus from my home garden. My beautiful squash were all wilted over, yellowing, and SICK. As I drove up and saw them I didn't take a suit case out of the car, I ran, literally, to the garden to have a look see. If you have ever had a squash bug infestation, you know what I mean when I say that there were quite literally hundreds of the ugly little cretins crawling on every other inch of my 12, four foot high (or were) yellow crook neck squash and zucchini plants. [caption id="attachment_2432" align="alignright" width="300"] "Baby" squash bugs[/caption]…
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Organic Squash Bug Control

Organic Squash Bug Control

Organic Pest & Disease Control
Let me share with you our squash bug control plan. I am not, I repeat NOT going to be overrun again this year by squash bugs! Young squash plants (especially zucchini and pumpkin) are generally more susceptible to damage by this pest, and if you don't squish the squash bugs, young plants will die. They say that "larger plants are more tolerant, though squash bug control may still be necessary". I disagree. All curcurbits (squash family) can be taken down, even the largest ones if there enough squash bugs feeding. Once plants have been attacked by these pests, their leaves may become spotted and begin turning brown. The biggest sign from a short distance is wilting. Once that starts both the vines and leaves turn black and crunchy. The biggest…
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Squash and Cross Pollination

Growing Food, Organic Gardening
Summer squash, winter squash, pumpkins and gourds belong to the Cucurbita family. Members of this family may cross-pollinate with each other. (Insects can bring pollen from other plants to female flowers.) However, the first year of a cross, the resulting fruit is completely normal looking and tasting. Only the end result seed carries the crossed gene. So, if you saved the seed and planted it the following year, you might get something strange as a result. If you are growing plants to eat the fruit, you do not have to worry about cross-pollination in your home garden. More... [caption id="attachment_3869" align="alignright" width="350"] Squash, summer squash, and assorted veggies[/caption] Grow Your Own Food How are beans pollinated? Watermelons and Cross Pollination
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Three Sisters: An Ancient Garden Trio

Three Sisters: An Ancient Garden Trio

Companion Planting, Gardening Methods, Organic Gardening, Our Homestead
"The Three Sisters all work together. Critters will find it harder to invade your garden by inter-planting your corn, beans and squash. The corn stalk serves as a pole for the beans, the beans help to add the nitrogen to the soil that the corn needs, while the squash provides a ground cover of shade that helps the soil retain moisture."[1] I have read that this companion planting combo helps keep the raccoons off your corn. Evidently they don't like wading through the pricklies of the squash to get up to the corn. I am trying this method at our farm/homestead this year (2010) using Golden Bantam corn, The Three Sisters is the name given by some Native Americans to the practice of growing corn, beans, and squash together. The…
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How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds

How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds

Healthy Eating
Whether you carve your pumpkin for a Halloween Jack O'Lantern or plan to use it for baking, be sure to save the seeds for roasting. Pumpkin seeds are rich in Vitamins B, E, and fiber. Homemade baked pumpkin seeds taste better and are healthier for you than the ones you buy in the store, because they are fresher and have less salt. As you scoop out the flesh from your pumpkin, remove as much pulp as you can from the seeds. Rinse the seeds and spread out to dry on a clean dish towel. Spread seeds out evenly on a cookie sheet. Spritz them with a little olive oil and give them just a sprinkle of salt. (Additional seasonings can be added like garlic powder, chili powder, seasoned salt, or…
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Harvesting and Storing Winter Squash

Harvesting and Storing Winter Squash

Food Storage
Harvest winter squash no later than the 1st or 2nd light frost as fruit can be damaged with prolonged exposure to temperature under 50 degrees F. When mature, squash cannot be dented with a fingernail. Fruit should be fully mature before storage. Immature squash will spoil quickly. When cutting off the vine, leave 2" of stem, but do not carry it by the stem when handling. Once harvested, cure the squash in a sunny window or a porch at 75-80 degrees for 1-2 weeks. This will allow the skin to harden further and scratched or dented areas to heal. To prolong storage period, kill any surface organisms by dipping the squash in a 1:10 dilution of bleach and water. Allow to drip dry, then store at 50-60 degrees in a…
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