Vegetable Garden Planting Chart

Vegetable Garden Planting Chart

Growing Food, Organic Gardening, Starting Seeds
Schedule your vegetable garden planting with this guide. As you plan which foods that you'd like to grow in your garden, remember that among other things, you must also take the following into account: Soil pH Requirements of Different Garden Vegetables Vegetable Gardening Basics (Planning, Preparing the soil, and Planting) Identifying Your Soil Type Note: This does not include plotting for Square Foot Gardening Food Vegetable Start Seed Indoors Plant in Garden S = SeedP = Plant Seed Spacing Distance Between Rows Seed Depth Days toMaturity YIELD PER100' ROW ArtichokesFeb-MarS - After FrostP - After Frost36"48"1/2"36535+ heads Asparagusn/aP - Mar-April8" between root tips34-36"1/4-1/2"365400+ spears Beans, Bush (snap)n/aS - After Frost4-6"18"1"60-6480 lbs Beans, bush (dry)n/aS - After Frost4-6"24"1"90-1008 lbs Beans, Polen/aS - After Frost8"36"1"70-85150 lbs Beans, Favan/aS - After Frost8"36"1"18020 lbs…
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How to Grow Horseradish

Herb Gardening, Organic Gardening
In 1995 the International Herb Association started naming a Herb of the Year. This practice brings focus each year to a particular herb so herb enthusiasts, groups and gardeners can learn more about an individual herb. This year, 2011, Horseradish, Armoracia rusticana, is the herb of the year. So, let's explore this pungent, powerful herb. Want to clear you sinuses? Prevent scurvy? Bring tears to your eyes? Then Horseradish is the herb for you! Botanical Info: Considered a bitter herb, helping digestion and appetite. Family: Brassicaceae- related to mustard, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, and Brussels sprouts. Genus and species: Armoracia rusticana Other common names: Scurvy Grass, Mountain Radish, Great Mountain Root, Pepperroot Horseradish is a root crop that is thought to be native to Northern or Central Europe. It is…
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Planting – Healthy Beginnings

Planting – Healthy Beginnings

Organic Gardening
No amount of watering or fertilizer will compensate for improper planting. On many occasions I have puzzled over the problems of plants only to discover they were planted six inches too deep or with their roots bound tightly. There isn't any mystery to good planting, just some common sense techniques. Dig the Hole First Before you unpot your plant, prepare a hole fifty to a hundred percent larger than the plant's root ball. Work some compost, peat moss or other soil conditioners into the soil you've removed. When planting smaller perennials or bedding plants, rather than preparing individual holes, it may be simpler to amend a larger area and use a trowel to place the individual plants. In the case of large trees, it is generally best not to amend…
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Still January

Growing Food, Organic Gardening, Our Homestead
Today I went outside to find the slightest whiff of spring in the air... or was it just wishful thinking? After checking with the online weather report, I realize it is probably wishful thinking and that peas will not be in the ground quite as early as I had at first hoped. It is going to RAIN. <sigh> The heirloom seeds have been ordered. The seed trays have been dusted off in the greenhouse, found their tables and are ready to plant. I wash them with castile soap, but you can also use a 3% bleach solution. ALWAYS start with things as clean as you can get them... especially if your supplies have sat around in a moist greenhouse all winter. I've heard that when the whippoorwill sings, it is time…
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Planting Properly

Planting Properly

Organic Gardening
Healthy Beginnings No amount of watering or fertilizer will compensate for improper planting. On many occasions I have puzzled over the problems of plants only to discover they were planted six inches too deep or with their roots bound tightly. There isn't any mystery to good planting, just some common sense techniques. Dig the Hole First Before you un-pot your plant, prepare a hole fifty to a hundred percent larger than the plant's root ball. Work some compost, peat moss or other soil conditioners into the soil you've removed. When planting smaller perennials or bedding plants, rather than preparing individual holes, it may be simpler to amend a larger area and use a trowel to place the individual plants. In the case of large trees, it is generally best not…
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