The ideal emergency preparedness food: Sprouts

The ideal emergency preparedness food: Sprouts

Emergency Preparedness, Food Storage, Healthy Eating, Self Sufficiency
Sprouts are THE ideal emergency preparedness food! Given the rapidity with which critical global events are unfolding, preparedness just makes good sense. The question isn't whether or not to be prepared - it is what to be prepared for? Earthquakes, nuclear accidents, tsunamis, power outages and gasoline shortages have been on this week's menu. Each, of course, has its own specific type of preparedness protocols. But, no matter what kind of unexpected event looms large, there is always a need for food. Food shortages could result from any of the aforementioned potential scenarios, as well as from any number of scenarios that I haven't mentioned. There are any number of ways to approach food shortage preparedness, but my preferred method is sprouts! Sprouts are, in my mind, the number one,…
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Five Must Have Supplies for Your Disaster Preparedness

Five Must Have Supplies for Your Disaster Preparedness

Emergency Preparedness, Food Storage, Self Sufficiency
It doesn't matter where you live, what your personal situation is, or what type of disasters you may potentially face, there are some basic supplies everyone should have on hand "just in case". Not being prepared for an emergency is bad planning for life, in general; "failing to plan is planning to fail" and all that. Here are five things that you should stock and store at all times to make sure you can make it no matter what live throws at you. More people are, at the least, more unnecessarily uncomfortable, and worse, placed in unnecessarily life threatening situations for lack of bad planning. Know the five "must have supplies that should be part of your disaster preparedness. [caption id="attachment_3762" align="alignright" width="300"] water is #1 on the disaster preparedness…
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Using Root Cellars to Preserve Food

Food Storage, Food Supply
With cold weather upon us, everyone should be working to save your harvest, either by storing or preserving. Canning, drying, and freezing, are good ways of preserving your crops such as beans, corn, peas, peppers, summer squash, and tomatoes. They need to be done immediately after picking, while crops are fresh and tasty. Whether you cold-store or preserve your produce depends on the type of food you've grown, your facilities, and your family's eating preferences. Cold storage of vegetables such as cabbage, beets, carrots, potatoes, squash, and turnips can give you the best tasting and healthiest food of the four methods, and may even be the least expensive in the long run. And you can eat every one of these garden-fresh even 4 to 6 months after they've been harvested!…
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How to Store Root Crops

How to Store Root Crops

Food Storage, Food Supply, Self Sufficiency
Learn how to store your root crops. Don't lose a single plant to waste by learning how to store them safely and with the most taste intact. Have your fall garden of root crops mature as late as possible by planting as late as possible. Cold weather sweetens the roots and you'll be putting the freshest produce into a cool root cellar, garage or back porch. Leave your last planting in the ground until the roots are fully mature; they'll store better if they're protected by a thicker skin. Whether you're going to eat most of your vegetables fresh, or you intend to freeze, can, or store them in a root cellar, a good rule of thumb is to harvest as close to the time you're going to eat or…
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Harvesting and Storing Winter Squash

Harvesting and Storing Winter Squash

Food Storage
Harvest winter squash no later than the 1st or 2nd light frost as fruit can be damaged with prolonged exposure to temperature under 50 degrees F. When mature, squash cannot be dented with a fingernail. Fruit should be fully mature before storage. Immature squash will spoil quickly. When cutting off the vine, leave 2" of stem, but do not carry it by the stem when handling. Once harvested, cure the squash in a sunny window or a porch at 75-80 degrees for 1-2 weeks. This will allow the skin to harden further and scratched or dented areas to heal. To prolong storage period, kill any surface organisms by dipping the squash in a 1:10 dilution of bleach and water. Allow to drip dry, then store at 50-60 degrees in a…
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The Root Cellar

The Root Cellar

Food Storage
...we offer the following article, copied without permission from the winter 2009/10 issue of Edible Hudson Valley. What come up must go down... Unearthing the Contemporary Root Cellar By Anne Dailey & photography by Jennifer May As we evolve as a society, various tools and technologies disappear from our daily lives, rendered obsolete by modern innovation. Butter churns, horse-drawn wagons, stone foundations and cast iron cook stoves faded first from use, then gradually from memory. In some cases, the things we lose become obsolete or no longer make sense for our needs and our culture. After all, evolution and innovation are often positive processes—if we come up with a tool that does the job better, we ought to use it. There are times, though, when the technology or tool we…
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