Organic Garden Yards – Oh the Controversy

Organic Garden Yards – Oh the Controversy

Community, Food Supply, Healthy Eating, Sustainable Landscaping
If you are not allowed to grow and eat your own food, then the legality of any other basic right is up for grabs. While it seems to be a new concept in the United States, it is not a new concept; who controls the food supply, controls the people. I have sat on my hands regarding this topic for some time now... but this heartbreaking story, explains a situation that is becoming disturbingly common in America today. Will they be coming for your lemon verbena and catnip next? Where will they draw the line, you can't grow squash because the squash bugs will become a neighborhood nuisance? In case you are not aware of Karl Tricamo, from Ferguson, Missouri, USA, he was involved in a Front Yard Garden Controversy…
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Using Root Cellars to Preserve Food

Food Storage, Food Supply
With cold weather upon us, everyone should be working to save your harvest, either by storing or preserving. Canning, drying, and freezing, are good ways of preserving your crops such as beans, corn, peas, peppers, summer squash, and tomatoes. They need to be done immediately after picking, while crops are fresh and tasty. Whether you cold-store or preserve your produce depends on the type of food you've grown, your facilities, and your family's eating preferences. Cold storage of vegetables such as cabbage, beets, carrots, potatoes, squash, and turnips can give you the best tasting and healthiest food of the four methods, and may even be the least expensive in the long run. And you can eat every one of these garden-fresh even 4 to 6 months after they've been harvested!…
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How to Store Root Crops

How to Store Root Crops

Food Storage, Food Supply, Self Sufficiency
Learn how to store your root crops. Don't lose a single plant to waste by learning how to store them safely and with the most taste intact. Have your fall garden of root crops mature as late as possible by planting as late as possible. Cold weather sweetens the roots and you'll be putting the freshest produce into a cool root cellar, garage or back porch. Leave your last planting in the ground until the roots are fully mature; they'll store better if they're protected by a thicker skin. Whether you're going to eat most of your vegetables fresh, or you intend to freeze, can, or store them in a root cellar, a good rule of thumb is to harvest as close to the time you're going to eat or…
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Garlic Scape Soup

Garlic Scape Soup

Using Herbs
Ingredients List: 10 garlic scapes. 5 cups of beef broth 1 cup of dry sherry ¼ cup of olive oil French bread, sliced and toasted Grated Parmesan cheese Salt and pepper Instructions Sauté the garlic in the olive oil until it turns golden. Heat the beef broth with sherry. When the broth reaches the boiling point, add garlic and the olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste; then simmer for about 30 minutes. Strain out the garlic and reheat. Sprinkle toasted French bread slices generously with Parmesan cheese, then place them in a 425°F (220°C) oven for about 3-4 minutes. Put the hot toast in the bottom of soup dishes; then pour the soup over top.
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Beneficial Insects-Who are the Good Guys?

Beneficial Insects-Who are the Good Guys?

Organic Pest & Disease Control
Most people think only of pests when they think of insects. But, the beneficial insects found in gardens do not feed on or harm plants. The typical backyard contains hundreds of species of insects, yet only a fraction can even be observed because many are microscopic and/or hidden below ground or within plant tissue. Most are just "passing through" or have very innocuous habits. Others actually feed on and destroy pest species, while others help decompose plant and animal matter, or act as plant pollinators. Beneficial insects can be categorized broadly as either predators or parasites. During development in both adult and immature stages, predators actively search out and consume their prey, while insect parasites develop in or on a single host from eggs or larvae deposited by the adult.…
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