How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds

How to Roast Pumpkin Seeds

Healthy Eating
Whether you carve your pumpkin for a Halloween Jack O'Lantern or plan to use it for baking, be sure to save the seeds for roasting. Pumpkin seeds are rich in Vitamins B, E, and fiber. Homemade baked pumpkin seeds taste better and are healthier for you than the ones you buy in the store, because they are fresher and have less salt. As you scoop out the flesh from your pumpkin, remove as much pulp as you can from the seeds. Rinse the seeds and spread out to dry on a clean dish towel. Spread seeds out evenly on a cookie sheet. Spritz them with a little olive oil and give them just a sprinkle of salt. (Additional seasonings can be added like garlic powder, chili powder, seasoned salt, or…
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Why Garden Organically?

Organic Gardening
As recent as 25 years ago, the idea of organic gardening was considered quite a radical concept.  How in the world were gardeners expected to control the weeds, the bugs, and the animals that could threaten a thriving garden without the use of man-made chemicals?  When you think about it, organic gardening is a really simply theory.  For years, people have been growing things without the use of chemicals. The early settlers of our country didn’t have Miracle-Gro or Sevin Dust and they made out just fine.  It only makes sense that we should be able to apply the same techniques and get the same results as they did today.  We should grow food using Mother Nature's ingredients rather than concoctions born in a chemist's laboratory for the good of…
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Harvesting and Storing Winter Squash

Harvesting and Storing Winter Squash

Food Storage
Harvest winter squash no later than the 1st or 2nd light frost as fruit can be damaged with prolonged exposure to temperature under 50 degrees F. When mature, squash cannot be dented with a fingernail. Fruit should be fully mature before storage. Immature squash will spoil quickly. When cutting off the vine, leave 2" of stem, but do not carry it by the stem when handling. Once harvested, cure the squash in a sunny window or a porch at 75-80 degrees for 1-2 weeks. This will allow the skin to harden further and scratched or dented areas to heal. To prolong storage period, kill any surface organisms by dipping the squash in a 1:10 dilution of bleach and water. Allow to drip dry, then store at 50-60 degrees in a…
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Soil PH Preferences for Garden Shrubs

Soil & Compost
How to use the information in the chart. To make the best of the lists, group plants with similar soil requirements. Also, avoid planting trees, shrubs, vegetables, flowers and herbs in an unsuitable pH. For example, lilac bushes won't do much if their feet are sitting in acid soil, while potatoes will be dotted with scab if the soil is too sweet. (Note: Don't use them as your only guide because other factors may lead to poor performance.) Plants are listed here in columns according to the pH level they prefer. Note that some are very sensitive to pH levels outside their tolerant range, in which case they will appear in more than one column even though they are colored yellow as being "sensitive". This green background means that this…
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Soil pH Preferences for Trees

Soil & Compost
How to use the information in the chart. To make the best of the lists, group plants with similar soil requirements. Also, avoid planting trees, shrubs, vegetables, flowers and herbs in an unsuitable pH. For example, lilac bushes won't do much if their feet are sitting in acid soil, while potatoes will be dotted with scab if the soil is too sweet. (Note: Don't use them as your only guide because other factors may lead to poor performance.) Plants are listed here in columns according to the pH level they prefer. Note that some are very sensitive to pH levels outside their tolerant range, in which case they will appear in more than one column even though they are colored yellow as being "sensitive". This green background means that this…
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Soil PH Preferences for Garden Vegetables

Soil & Compost
How to use the information in the chart. To make the best of the above lists, group plants with similar soil requirements. Also, avoid planting trees, shrubs, vegetables, flowers and herbs in an unsuitable pH. For example, lilac bushes won't do much if their feet are sitting in acid soil, while potatoes will be dotted with scab if the soil is too sweet. (Note: Don't use them as your only guide because other factors may lead to poor performance.) Plants are listed here in columns according to the pH level they prefer. Note that some are very sensitive to pH levels outside their tolerant range, in which case they will appear in more than one column even though they are colored yellow as being "sensitive". This green background means that…
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Soil PH Preferences for Potted Plants

Soil & Compost
How to use the information in the chart. To make the best of the lists, group plants with similar soil requirements. Also, avoid planting trees, shrubs, vegetables, flowers and herbs in an unsuitable pH. For example, lilac bushes won't do much if their feet are sitting in acid soil, while potatoes will be dotted with scab if the soil is too sweet. (Note: Don't use them as your only guide because other factors may lead to poor performance.) Plants are listed here in columns according to the pH level they prefer.Note that some are very sensitive to pH levels outside their tolerant range, in which case they will appear in more than one column even though they are colored yellow as being "sensitive". This green background means that this is…
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Soil PH Preferences for Garden Ornamentals

Soil & Compost
How to use the information in the chart. To make the best of the lists, group plants with similar soil requirements. Also, avoid planting trees, shrubs, vegetables, flowers and herbs in an unsuitable pH. For example, lilac bushes won't do much if their feet are sitting in acid soil, while potatoes will be dotted with scab if the soil is too sweet. (Note: Don't use them as your only guide because other factors may lead to poor performance.) Plants are listed here in columns according to the pH level they prefer. Note that some are very sensitive to pH levels outside their tolerant range, in which case they will appear in more than one column even though they are colored yellow as being "sensitive". This green background means that this…
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Plant pH Charts

Soil & Compost
Charts of Plant's Preferred Soil Ph The links to lists of plants below take you to the various classes of plants from lime haters to lime lovers. No list is ever static, especially one on the web. Hopefully you will find this list comprehensive enough for your needs. However,if you find a plant which from your experience you think is in the wrong category, or you can add a plant from your own experience, please email us. The plant lists are in tables, which take a moment or two to download, so please be patient. These lists should aide you in selecting plants that are suitable for your soil if you leave it as it is, or help you to identify what pH would be best for the plants that…
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Cutting Tomato Horn Worm Damage

Cutting Tomato Horn Worm Damage

Organic Pest & Disease Control
Ever wake up one morning to this? One day your tomatoes are looking better than you've ever seen them and WHAMMO! Without warning, without notice, they are decimated overnight. [caption id="attachment_5444" align="aligncenter" width="640"] whammo! Overnight! Hornworm damage, er, decimation[/caption] The first clue beside the obvious disappearance of leaves is little black "droppings" that look like mice turds on your tomato leaves or on the ground around your plants. [caption id="attachment_5447" align="aligncenter" width="640"] hornworm poop, er, castings[/caption] First course of action in the organic garden is to understand Integrated Pest Management. Good soil and good planting practices... this, however, won't do much to deter this little critter. And the best way to get rid of them is to simply pick them off. If you can't stand the way to the creepy…
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