Community gardens are sprouting up around the city

Community gardens are sprouting up around the city

Community
Community gardens are sprouting up around the city There's a new crop of farmers around Tulsa. These community gardeners aren't interested in making a profit, but rather working the land together to share the fruits of their labor. Community gardening has long been popular, and often necessary, in larger cities or urban areas where space is hard to come by. The idea is beginning to catch on in smaller cities, including Tulsa, with people who don't have time to manage a backyard garden, don't have the space to start a garden or with those who simply enjoy the process of gardening with others. Demalda Newsome of Newsome Community Farms has four community gardens around Tulsa, including one at Neighbor for Neighbor at 505 E. 36th St. North and another at…
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Saving Seeds from Your Garden

Saving Seeds from Your Garden

Seed Saving
For many gardeners, the garden actually begins in January when the first seed catalog arrives in the mailbox. While the cold wind howls outside, we retire to a cozy chair and leaf through the catalog, carefully notating which varieties of lettuce and tomatoes to try and wishing we had the space to plant each and every flower so artfully displayed on its pages. But have you ever wondered where your great-grandparents acquired the seeds for their gardens, before there were seed catalogs and fancy garden centers? They saved seeds for the next year from their own gardens! Saving seeds from your own flowers or vegetables is a wonderful way to fully experience the cycle of plant growth. It's also much less expensive than buying seeds each spring, and seeds saved…
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On Vermicomposting…

Vermicomposting
I found this on gardening quotes the other day. Check out the date... "Worms seem to be the great promoters of vegetation, which would proceed but lamely without them, by boring, perforating, and loosening the soil, and rendering it pervious to rains and the fibres of plants, by drawing straws and stalks of leaves and twigs into it, and, most of all, by throwing up such infinite numbers of lumps of earth called worm-casts, which, being their excrement, is a fine manure for grain or grass. - The Rev. Gilbert White of Selborne, 1777 They knew, even then, they knew..
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