Compost’s Carbon: Nitrogen Ratios

Soil & Compost
Everything organic has a ratio of carbon to nitrogen (C:N) in its tissues. See below for a list of C:N ratios of common organic wastes. It is the combination of materials that creates the ideal climate for compost microbes-a C:N ratio of 30:1. This combination, along with moisture, volume and surface area, is what makes a fast, hot pile. Some composters like to keep things simple and use the terms brown (carbon) and green (nitrogen), and follow the general rule of 1 part brown for every 2 parts green. Manure (Fresh)15:1 Legumes (peas etc.)15:1 Grass Clippings20:1 Manure w/Weeds23:1 Weeds (Fresh)25:1 Hay (Dry)40:1 Leaves (Fresh)40:1 Leaves (Dry)60:1 Weeds (Dry)90:1 Straw, cornstalks100:1 Pine Needles110:1 Sawdust500:1 Wood Chips700:1 Other composters like to build their piles using a variety of materials and using the…
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Where did carrots come from?

Where did carrots come from?

Growing Food, Organic Gardening
From Whence Came the Carrot? Where do you think carrots originated? We're not talking about the wild carrots that only a rabbit might consider delectable. We're talking about the nice thick tuber, orange (now) and full of Vitamin A. How does Afghanistan grab you? Yup. But it wasn't orange. It was likely deep red or purple. And it was often confused with the turnip! One of the oldest plant foods, this member of the parsley family got traded north and west to the Mediterranean. The Greeks used its seeds and leaves to cure stomach ailments, but rarely ate the root because of its bitterness. But the precursor carrot traveled even further. The very first French carrot importer was Charlemagne! He encouraged the importation of new edibles from around the world…
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Having a problem with slugs in your garden?

Having a problem with slugs in your garden?

Organic Gardening, Organic Pest & Disease Control
Solve it by appealing to their problem drinking. If you have slugs in your garden, there is a natural, organic way to decrease their population and increase the life of the plants that those slimey creatures so love to eat: lure them into beer traps and drown them. Slugs are attracted to beer for the combination of yeast and the carbonation . Beer used to attract slugs (and ultimately drown them) is an organic way to reduce slug populations. Other beneficials like frogs and earthworms won't get caught in the crossfire like they do in commercial preparations. Poison baits that include metaldehyde (Deadline) and methiocarb (Mesurol) are harsh chemicals and are not always successful anyway. [caption id="attachment_2172" align="alignright" width="300"] slugs... eww![/caption] There's only one real downside to this idea.. slugs…
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