Freecyle!

Freecyle!

Community
Got closets and basements full of stuff you never use? Need stuff but don’t feel like paying for it? Try Freecycle – a never-ending garage sale of free stuff. Freecycle is a network of over 9 million people connected via online community groups who give and/or receive stuff for free in their own hometowns everyday. Everything from toys, to computers, to household items is available in an online, always-on garage sale for free stuff. Number of Freecycle Communities as of today: 3,094. This post was originally from 2006, the number has now grown to over 5,000!) This concept helps keep stuff from going into our landfills. Reuse/recycle means less need for virgin material, and it reduces the strain on valuable resources, such as fuel, forest and water supplies. Promotes a…
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Community Supported Agriculture

Community
What is Community Supported Agriculture (CSA)? Problem statement: People in the U.S. and other industrialized countries walk into a supermarket and buy fresh fruits, vegetables, and meats without knowing anything about the kind of farm where the food was grown, or how far the food had to travel to get to the grocery store. This ignorance is leading to the demise of local small-scale farms that contribute to local economies. This ignorance is also leading to the degradation of soil, air, and water because large-scale farms tend to use large amounts of pesticides and chemical fertilizers, plus farming practices that promote soil erosion. In the 1980s several farmers brought the idea of community-supported agriculture (CSA) to North America. Since then over 1000 CSAs have been formed in the U.S. Many…
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The Animal Farm Accountability Question

Community, Farm Animals
If you don't belong to the 'grist mill' perhaps you should at least read this article... Old Big Brother Had a Farm I liked Mary Zanoni, executive director of Farm for Life's bottom line... "Zanoni sums up the views of many independent farmers: "Real food security comes from raising food yourself or buying from a local farmer you actually know. The USDA plan will only stifle local sources of production through over-regulation and unmanageable costs."
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Vermicomposting? What’s THAT? Composting with vermin?

Vermicomposting? What’s THAT? Composting with vermin?

Organic Gardening, Our Homestead, Vermicomposting
Vermicomposting? Aaaaaa hahaha... honest to God, that's the first thing that went through my mind when I first saw the word. I'm SO not kidding. But it's meaning is this... the use of specially bred earthworms, esp. to aerate soil and convert organic matter into compost; also called vermicuture vermi = worm culture. Sound sort of icky, but have you EVER smelled BAD compost? Ewwwwww. Now, have you ever smelled the forest floor? Good clean soil? Actually the soil is down below. In a good forest, the first four inches or so is humus (A brown or black organic substance consisting of partially or wholly decayed vegetable or animal matter that provides nutrients for plants and increases the ability of soil to retain water.) I was going somewhere with this...…
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Starting a Community Garden

Starting a Community Garden

Community
Get the basics on starting a community garden in your area This fact sheet is designed to give many different groups the basic information they need to get their gardening project off the ground. These lists are in no way meant to be complete. Each main idea will probably trigger more questions, so an assortment of ways to carry out that idea are presented; pick and choose those that seem to apply to your own situation. Form a Planning Committee Choose a Site Prepare and Develop the Site Organize the Garden Insurance Setting up a New Gardening Organization Organizational Considerations Bylaws How to Manage Your Community Garden Sample Guidelines and Rules Application Form Troubleshooting Children's Plots People Problems and Solutions Resources Form a Planning Committee Determine if there really is…
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How to Build a Worm Bin

How to Build a Worm Bin

Self Sufficiency, Vermicomposting
Why Build a Worm Bin? Reduces waste disposal costs. Raises worms for fishing. Has no foul smell or pests. Provides a convenient method for converting kitchen vegetable wastes into a rich organic fertilizer for house and garden plants. Build a worm composting bin by following these five steps: Build your worm bin Wooden, plastic or metal boxes or tubs may be used. The container should be 8"-12" deep and of a size to accommodate the amount of garbage you produce. Approximately one square foot of surface area is needed for each pound of kitchen vegetable wastes per week. For example, a 1'×2' × 3' box will serve a family of 4 to 6.  Add Bedding Bedding is the living medium and also a food source for the worms. Bedding holds…
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Community Garden Resources List

Community Garden Resources List

Community
Most communities are full of people who would like to make a difference. Take the time to survey your community to discover what is already being done. Explore these community garden resources. Find the need in your community and make a difference. Community Garden Resources List Starting Your Own Community Garden Starting a Community Garden - Get the basics on starting a community garden in your area This fact sheet is designed to give many different groups the basic information they need to get their gardening project off the ground. All-America City Program http://www.nclweb.org/aac - Encourages & recognizes civic excellence where community members, government, business & non-profit organizations work together to address critical local issues. American Horticultural Society http://www.ahs.org - Gardening education for all skill levels, source of gardening information,…
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Trichogramma Wasp

Uncategorized
Prevent worm pests before plants become damaged with these moth egg parasites. The Trichogramma are a group of minute wasps (smaller than a needle’s eye) that lay their eggs in pest moth eggs, where the wasp offspring develop, kill the pest larvae, and produce new wasps. [caption id="attachment_2470" align="alignright" width="259"] photo courtesy Peggy Greb, USDA Agricultural Research Service, #5526014 Bugwood.org [/caption] Preferred food: The eggs of more than 200 pests, including borers, webworms, loopers, leafworms, fruitworms, cutworms, bollworms, and armyworms (except beet armyworms). The wasps lay their eggs in the pest eggs, killing them. The adult wasps emerge anywhere from 7 to 75 days, depending on temperature and moisture. Trichogramma wasps attacks eggs of over 200 varieties of insects, almost all moth and butterfly eggs that hatch into worm pests.…
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